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with a daring new plan to save greece. >> welcome back. greece has announced a plan to buy back bonds as part of its effort to reduce its debt load. >> the success of the plan is essential to unlocking the next payment of eight athens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work -- of aid to a thens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work. >> german finance minister wolfgang schaeuble and his french counterpart, pierre moscovici, went in front of parliament. >> things have to move fast. there is no reason to worry. the calculations are realistic. i hope it works. >> there is no plan b. >> the finance ministers brushoff warnings that the programs might not reduce greek debt enough. spain has formally asked for almost 40 billion euros in aid for its troubled banking sector. >> a strong indication that we have been successful in stabilizing the eurozone. spain now leads -- need less than originally assumed. the situation has improved. >> another trouble spot is cyprus. the country needs a bailout of between 10 billion euros and 17 billion euros. officials are waiting for our report on
for greece's rural population. >> but first, here are some other stories making headlines. thousands of sunni muslims are continuing their protests against the iraqi government, demanding the resignation of the prime minister, accusing him of sectarian politics. that's after bodyguards of the sunni finance minister were arrested on terrorism charges last week. >> the president of the central african republic has appealed to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just th
, european finance ministers have said yes to releasing more aid to greece. in a 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens -- >> the 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens. >> there are some who believe it is nothing more than a band-aid. >> emotions spilled over as workers tried to storm a meeting between greek and german officials today are angry over layoffs that are part of broad austerity measures. greeks see the reason to believe next year will be any better. >> they may receive the tranche, but it would be spent in a few months. we will soon be asking for more money. i don't see how that will help the economy. >> one minister remains hopeful, consulting with his counterparts on how to get the economy back on its feet. >> we want to work together to organize a support fund to promote economic growth in greece. >> but that would require attracting private investors. to do that, greece must first settle it unpaid bills. >> of the 9 billion euros that greece still owes, we will pay back everything by 2013 in accordance with the troika deal. >> so, for now, greek
in neighboring turkey, lebanon, and jordan. a much smaller number have made their way to greece. this report from lesbos just off the coast of turkey. >> the immigrants who wash ashore on the greek islands are now struggling with their first european winter. they are somalis, afghanistan annies, and, increates -- increasingly, syrians. all at a camp run by volunteers who provide food and shelter the this is ahmed, who has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brothner athens. >> our life is destroyed in syria. we cannot stay in syria. the war airplanes float in the sky and bombing the houses, we cannot stay in syria. >> the turkish mainland is not far behind me. it's not far away but the journey is very dangerous. the boats supplied by people smugglers are often old and in bad condition, and at this time be year the seas could be very rough. not everyone makes it across. these were afghanis. more than 20 drowned. here is the only survivor, who was fished half-dead and freezing cold out of the sea by greek coast guards. now trying to call friends and family to tell them he's alive
greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
that a crucial vote on egypt's constitution could be delayed. we've got the latest. greece's debt crisis turns its hospitals into virtual ses pools. how it is spawning health disaster that could reach far beyond its borders. piles of money coming up. ♪ . melissa: now onto the middle east. the pressure not letting up for egyptian predent mohammed morsi. reports say he is ready to postpone the scheduled vote on the new constitution which would cement his sweeping powers. earlier today protesters broke through the barriers around the presidential palace. police fired tear gas at a crowd of almost 1000 people out seed cairo tv studios. we have a fox news contributor, specializing in middleeast counterterrorism affairs. lisa, it looks like things are getting more out of control all the time. people keep saying ts is going to calm down. what is your, what is your take on it? >> well, as long as moi's factions, the muslim brotherhood will remain steadfast in a power grab d maintaining their agenda, the people, opposition saying this is not what we fought for the company will remain in perpetual rev
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
. >> thanks for joining us. another moment of truth for athens -- when greece finds out weather its author -- offer to repurchase debt from private investors has paid off. that will help trigger the release of more rescue funds that greece so desperately needs to stay afloat. >> athens has offered to pay 10 billion euros to holders of its sovereign debt at a buyback value of up to 40 cents per euro. to be successful, the sale has to cut a greek national debt by 20 billion euros. news from athens made investors nervous this friday. our correspondence sent us this report from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the suspense on the stock trading floor that weather or not the creditors of greece would take part in the debt buyback was too much for many investors. they decided to take some of the book's profits and sell shares. shares of deutsche telekom were the biggest dax losers. in order to invest money into new technologies such as broadband networks, they decided to cut the dividend for investors. now, many people here fear that this is something that more companies might do also next year,
the latest. greece's debt crisis turns its hospitals into virtual ses pools. how it is spawning health disaster that could reach far beyond its borders. piles of money coming up. ♪ . [ abdul-raid ] i've been working since i was about 16. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- you know, it's like it just hits you fast. you know, you start thinking about what's really important here. ♪ music is a universal language. but when i was in an accent... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i neverissed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people lookingut for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. melissa: now onto the middle east. the pressure not letting up for egyptian president mohammed morsi. reports say he is ready to postpone the scheduled vote on the new constitution which would cement
and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the british will get 90% of greece. the russians get 90% of bulgaria, and hungary, and divide it up that way. it was pretty cynical. but when roosevelt dies, in april of '45, his last telegram to churchill was, we always have these minor disafremonts with the russians about we end up resolving them so let's not make a big deal. no reason we can't maintain friendship after the war. when truman gets in there in 1945, april 12, he immediately takes a different course. roosevelt's alliance with the wartime alliance with the soviets was still very strong at that point. but truman turns to advisers who roosevelt never trusted in the first place, didn't pay any heed to, people like burns. the second day of the 13th -- burns in south carolina, a private plane, and as -- burns gives them same message, the soviets are break all their agreements. they cannot trusted, and within two weeks the u.s. policy tornado the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's that big meeting on april 23rd with molotov and april 23rd, the uni
't get. see if you can do better. it wouldn't take much. >>> greece's national bank euro bank alfa and perez says they need the money following disclosures by the lenders last week. greece is concerned that the 50 billion euros set aside for bank recapitalization will be enough to cover the shortfall. >>> and the italian treasury is holding its last debt sale of the year. traders are expecting to see solid demand for the paper after rome placed nearly 12 billion euros of shorted dated paper just yesterday. still, they warn investors could become more discerning in the new year especially as the italian electric tore ral race on thursday. italy expects to raise around 10 billion euros next year. less supply. we know there's still plenty of investor demand and no sign necessarily of re-ignited concern about the longer term health of these -- you could call them peripheral economies. >> no. things have really improved. it's all still down to the ecb's pledge to support these countries if they fulfill the conditions. especially in the case of italy. the country is fulfilling conditions
into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the communist resistors that fought against the nazis. the british were ruthless. that is another point. people say look at what stalin did in poland. he broke the altar. i don't believe they did. i will tell you more about that. look what the british did. but we did increase in the cold war period, the early cold war period we and the truman doctrine of 47 to 49, we had american advisers and early vietnam there were already over increase read the the british coal is truly to get back the mediterranean, along the region's coming get iran back in the conflict in iran in 1945. beyond that, it's crucial. we showed that in the beautiful maps. he gets to the far east and it is the richest resources around known to britain, not us. so then it isn't -- you can't dhaka the u.s. soviet relations without talki
and stalin in october of 44. dividing up -- the british forget 90% of greece and the russians would get 90% of bulgaria and hungary and they divided up that way. it was pretty cynical. but when roosevelt dies, in april of 45, his last telegram to churchill was, we always have these minor disagreements with the russians but we end up resolving them. so let's not make a big deal. there's no reason we can't maintain friendship after the war. when truman gets in there on april 12, 1945, immediately takes a different course. roosevelts alliance with the wartime alliance with the soviets was still strong at that point the truman turns to advisers who roosevelt never trusted in the first place and didn't pay heed to. people like burns and second day he flies burns through his private plane and burns gets german the same message. the soviets are breaking all of their agreements and they can't be trusted. and so what we are going to see is within two weeks the u.s. policy toward the soviet union's going to change in april 1945. by the time there's the big meeting on april 23 with molotov and on apr
in surplus, washington state in certification plus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are an easing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit regions. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. the banker is the same thing as a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. 1 -- society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down in 2008. in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding together these economies. this is not the first time these things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you h
or any american congress borrow anymore money until with fix this country from becoming greece. that requires significant entitlement reform to save social from bankruptcy and medicare from bankruptcy. social security is going bankrupt in about 20, 25 years. medicare is going bankrupt in 15 or 20 years. the baby boomers are coming in at 10,000 a day. and we just can't scene this. martha: president last week said we'll not play that game. last time around they wouldn't let the debt ceiling go up, i tell you right now, something to this effect we will play that game. >> we will play that game, mr. president. that is not a game. the game you're play something small ball. you're talking about raising rates on top 2% that would run the government for 11 days. you got reelected. how about doing something big that is not liberal? how about doing something big that is bipartisan. every big idea he has is a liberal idea that drowns us in debt. how been maing up, mr. president and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece? doing what boehner, tip o'n
fledged banking union and bailout loans for greece. what was being done to prevent another global downturn? that was on queen elizabeth's mind as she visited the bank of england. >> trying her hand at high finance, the queen, put in her signature on a special, a bank note. >> it does not improve much. >> the bank note, worth 1 million pounds, seem like small change as the queen and duke of edinburgh were shown the vaults were gold reserves were kept. there are 27 billion pounds of gold in this fault alone. that is not something you see every day, even when you have been doing this sort of thing for 60 years. has the tour went on, talk turned to more serious matters. the queen once asked why nobody had seen the financial crisis coming. officials launched into a three- part lecture on what caused the crisis. the words like "paradigm" flew across the floor. both the duke and the queen listened intently. finally, it became a two-way conversation, and the queen offered a few thoughts of her own. first, a question about the bankers. >> complacency. >> and then a question about the regulator, the
government privatisation plans. and and greece, civil servants have gone on a 24-hour price against job cuts. many public services were disrupted in the capital. >>> in south korea, voters have elected their first female president, who follows in the footsteps of her father who was also president. she is vowing to batter the economy. >> she has occupied a place on the national stage since the early 20's, but this is something new. if just before midnight, in freezing temperatures in central seoul, she addressed her supporters and the nation as the first female president elect. >> i will be the people's president who keeps promises to the citizens. this is the year of happiness we have all been waiting for. >> south korea remains a male- dominated society. just half of the working age women still have a job. if some see this as a transformative moment. >> there has been a glass ceiling in this society. with a woman president, took that we will demonstrate our troop qualities. >> i admit defeat, but it is just my defeat, not not that of others who are hoping to have a new government. i congrat
and transportation workers have staged a 24-hour strike in the greek capital. strikes have become frequent in greece since public spending has been cut to meet conditions for international bailout funding. >> iraq's president has arrived for medical treatment following a stroke. few details have been released about the seriousness of his condition. he is seen as a unifying force in iraq, mediating among sunnis, shia, and kurds. >> protesters in several indian cities are calling for action to stop the increasing number of violent rapes of women, following the rape and beating of a 23-year-old by six men on a bus in new delhi. doctors say the young woman is still in critical condition. >> christmas is, of course, just around the corner, and many retailers have been targeting customers, looking for that last-minute gift. and then there is this -- how about a personal shopper when you are at the airport? >> sounds good. as it turns out in frankfurt, germany, there is one, and he is especially looking to help out an increasing number of travelers from china, who are looking to part with lots of cash. >>
energy out of houston of the israel is cutting cypress and greece in on the deal. there was some confusion or some conflict as to who's exclusive economic zone these gas fields were in. israel got ahead of the conflict and cut greece and cypress into the deal so that they would be partnering with israel to exploit these fields rather than competing with israel. sandra: rapidly developing story. to put it in nato secretary-general rasmussen's words, i think now it is only a matter of time. so we'll continue to follow that story. thanks so much for joining us tonight, chris harmer. >> thank you, pressure sandra. pleasure to be here. sandra: handouts to the wind industry have gone so well so why not give them tens of millions more? notice sarcasm out there. they want to build a wind farm completely out ad sea. are think out to lunch? >>> how rising temperatures are threatening to burr i the multibillion-dollar industry. that's coming up. do you ever have too much money? ♪ . copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advai i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is
, but will be a couple points worse than greece and spain. so that's a big negative for george osbourne. another one will be getting the percentage of debt compared with gdp in the country, getting that down within a five-year period, getting it syncing in the right direction. he thought it was going to peek around 75%, 75%. it looks like it could go up even further. so let's see what he says on that front today. in terms of options, he has very few options indeed because this is a government which as we know has set its fallout on plan a. and yet, are we seeing real austerity? i'm not entirely sure. government borrowing this fiscal year so far in the five months that we have figures for already is 26.7% higher than the same period a year ago. the idea originally this year was for flat spending and then getting it down there after. and he's having to borrow more and more money, october figures were around 2.6 billion pounds more in borrowing than analysts expected. having to borrow more because tax receipts and corporations are falling. the labor party -- i was speaking to rachel reeves earlier on,
.s. ambassador to nato, greece, and a number of other places. nick, great to see you. you are such an old hand, veteran diplomat, and were at least at the state department. i think you were serving in greece. the last time we had one of these major reports, which was on the 1998 bombings. this report has been done by two senior experienced people, tom pickering and admiral mike mullen, and my indications are that it is really going to be very tough on the state department. hillary clinton has to defend this and present it to congress. >> well, andrea, i don't have a preliminary indication of what the report was saying, but i think secretary clinton would drae grae to testify publicly, but there are obviously congress has an obligation i think they have chosen to highly objective non-political, non-partisan people in tom pickering, ambassador tom pickering, and admiral mike mullen, and we'll see what the report says, but clearly the administration does need to deal with these issues before we get to 2013 and the president's inauguration. >> and one of the questions that is being examined is all
ministers agreed to give greece its next bailout payment of $64 billion. in return, greece has agreed to reduce its debt load by buying back devalued bonds from private investors. the european court of human rights issued a landmark ruling today condemning the c.i.a.'s extraordinary renditions programs. it ruled that a german car salesman khaled el-masri was a victim of torture and abuse for four months at the hands of the c.i.a. el-masri said he was kidnapped from macedonia in 2003, interrogated and tortured at an afghan prison run by the c.i.a. and then dropped on an albanian mountainside when authorities realized he posed no threat. macedonia agreed to pay nearly $80,000 in damages. the u.s. has closed internal investigations into the el-masri case. starting today there should be one less reason to reach for the television remote. a new federal law went into effect banning broadcasters from airing commercials at volumes louder than the programming they accompany. the television industry has had one year to adopt the new rules. violations can be reported on the federal communication
, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much for joining us. good to see you tonight. >> you heard piers morgan talk about it with larry last week. af
't become a country that looks like greece. [talking over each other] gregg: capitol hill and pennsylvania avenue, maybe they just think 16 trillion, 25 trillion, who cares. maybe they don't think it has a depressive effect on economic growth, and soaking up the credit markets, which women's businesses. >> that's exactly right. we don't have to wonder what this will go by. all we have to do is look over the pond and see what's happening in countries like greece and italy and spain and ireland have these massive debt. now we cannot repay them, massive interest-rate increases, you and i have talked about this before. but shame on us for not realizing that we stay on this path, we are in real financial trouble. gregg: stephen moore, economics writer for "the wall street journal." on her way to the fiscal cliff. thank you very much. heather: russian president vladimir putin accused of playing politics with the lives of orphans. signing a bill banning americans from adopting russian children. bad news has left dozens of american families heartbroken. amy kellogg is live in london with details.
your retirement, have brought us to the brink of becoming greece, the people that are stealing from their children and breaking open their piggy banks, how can they call people who pay half of the taxes greedy? they're the ones that are agreey, they're the ones that are selfish, and they're the ones that have spent beyond their means. you rarely hear that. why is that? the left controls most media outlets in the country and they define compassion and generosity by spending other people's money. this is a selfish, massive power grab and this is done by greedy politicians, you know, the ones that claim they care about you as they crat -- as they create d see, there are 18 mor million me americans on food stamps. 50 million americans in total on food stampletion. one in six americans live in poverty, millions more living paycheck to paycheck. i suspect with all the government compassion, i believe people would rather live debt-free. there's a lot of good time spending their money and then blaming the people who are giving them the money. if we're going to save america, we've got to rec
of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different historical background. they belong to different empires in the 19th century. they have different political traditions and mostly because they have given experiences of the war. germany was nazi germany. poland resisted very strongly. the nazis had one of the most resistant mov
of diplomacy helped broker a cease-fire. number three, in europe greece was the problem child that spent too much, save nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership didn't stop constant violent protests, staged by those facing loss of jobs, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. europe's leaders including the new french president committed to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? number two. the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its use of air power. >> one of the questions most asked in 2012, was how much longer can this man hold on to power? assad was under intense pressure to step down. but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition. civilians caught in the crossfire. more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> this is, yet, another bread line. >> the opposition fights on making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of additional support for the international community. number one -- she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shocked. she
and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. it can be uplifting when the times are good. greece won it in 2005, but is it appropriate for the greeks to pump millions or billions in? i think austerity is one reason. but i think also the tone is another. is it right to be celebrating in spandex when your people are out on the streets? >> reporter: looking at some of the countries' economic scorecards, it's hardly surprising. greece is aware that taking part could be an issue. especially as its economy is expected to drop to minus 4.5% next year. portugal, meanwhile, is expected to shrink 1.8%. and poland and slovakia have decided to spend their money on other projects. that's despite projecting positive growth for 2013. ♪ it reportedly costs around $160,000 to take part. and if you win, some countries spend big to host the lavish event. for some national broadcasters, this is reason enough to pull out. >> the cost of staging has been mounting in recent years. russia put on
another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways to -. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you through -- you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different historical background. they belong to different empires in the 19th century. they have different political traditions and mostly because they have given experiences of the war. germany was nazi germany. poland resist
everywhere at once at all times. and in greece, it was an utter disaster. so, i would love to follow hovering behind him, churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting. and then when he sells his generals on the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, he says no. we will go to some mantra. he gave them fits -- we will go to sumatra. he gave them fits. >> so, you tell all kinds of stories in your. to cover the dunkirk story. what year was dunkirk. where was he in that process? >> the evacuation? >> yes. >> that would be the last week of may, the first few days of june in the 1940's. the french had been defeated essentially in brittany. the french expeditionary force, 100,000 men strong, half of them were stalled of the san -- south of the sienne. the other have spearheaded against the germans, and in short order the french collapsed against belgium. they did it over a week -- at first, they thought they would get 10,000 or 12,000 men out. then anything that could float was sent over there. the got more than 200,000 british troops out. i found it interesting that several thousand fren
say greece? >> host: what does it mean for the pentagon? >> guest: any program, how did you continue? greece used to be one of the only three great non-u.s. countries, spending about 2% of gdp on national security. we were spending fortified at the time. we are under four. responding to something. they are now below that and having even further south because they simply can't afford it. >> host: new jersey, democratic collar. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. first of all, i am a retired army colonel, executive and also an author. adelle lot of research on the federal budget. whenever we start talking about social security and medicare, the entitlements and relating it to the annual budget deficit, we're making a mistake. no part today in a problem. a problems exist for three principal reasons. the spending increases for the war and other things that we basically did not fund. second, we had a huge loss in employment in 2007 and 2008 where people stop paying taxes and start drawing welfare. number three, we have the tax cuts, both the bush tax cuts and the obama tax cuts which
and albania as greece is from finland and europe is divided in different ways and has changed quite a lot. i would say there are a few elements though of a communist the communist past that you can see in post-communist countries. sometimes there is a paranoid elements and politics that comes from just a legacy of people being spied on and people having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals being done behind their backs. secret deals were done behind their backs and that is untenable and there is an anxiety about being less behind or left out by the west and seem to be inside the western hands. the memory that continues to play out but in truth these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. c-span: you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? and what were the three? >> guest: i chose poland, hungary and east germany? c-span: why those three? >> guest: i chose them because they were different because they have horse -- different historical backgrounds and they had a different political and mostly because they have
people believe that what's happening in greece cannot happen in the united states. but think about it. greece kept borrowing and spending until eventually they couldn't pay their public workers, take care of the elderly or the poor or deliver any of the services promised to their people. the united states is headed down the very same path. we'll be right back here having this same debate very soon if we don't cut spending. instead we'll be discussing the top 2%, next time it will be the top 50%. and so on. until we're all being attacked, every one. but spending so much that we still cannot meet our only gations -- obligations. this debate should be about spending, not taxes. so that we can give the american people what they want, a strong economy and a guarantee that programs like social security and medicare will remain in tact. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlelady from the virgin islands seek recognition? mrs. christensen: address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without
. google is flying from south to north. so i think they're kind of mingling right now in greece. so in santorini. this is his dashboard. you can see where he is. there's a lot of games. kids having a ball with it. it shows you where santa is. he's leaving his presence as he moves. he's moving from africa north. so now they kind of just bypassed each other in greece. and now google is now in finland where the other guy is. or similar santa was earlier. they're kind of meeting in the middle. just around the equator. >> here's the thing, we just don't want a midair santa crash. that would be the worst case scenario. thank you so much, alexandria, in an age of e-mails and tweets, here we go. it's nice to know that a letter can still be a powerful tool. it also helps if you have a powerful role model. that would be 9-year-old gabriella miller. she got strangers from around the world to write letters to santa. that out pouring will bring some joy for severely ill children like gabriella herself. now, our affiliate has the story. >> we have a mountain of letters here. >> reporter: chris' c
it. here's john travolta, olivia newton john, his co-star from "greece," yeah. ♪ i'm coming home tonight ♪ >> i find it weird on so many levels. >> do you? >> yes. i mean look i wish him the best and i don't know the guy. i'm sure he's a lovely person and stuff, but i don't know, there's something going on. i don't know, there's a lot going on. >> i so disagree. we were talking about this -- >> you like it? >> i do. i think it's great between the two -- >> you're sucking up to john travolta because you hang out. >> no, i'm not sucking up, for the love of god. i think it's really cute, the two of them together. >> sure. okay. >> okay, all right. >> that's your story and you're sticking with it. >> i am. >> i haven't seen this. is this on a plane? >> well, you know, he's landing his plane, charlie -- >> landing the plane, they're reunited. >> oh, okay. >> and she's like a lovely lady and he's like a nice guy. i wish him nothing but the best and i hope it's a huge success. i've got no dog in the fight. >> anderson. >> as i said, what do i know about music?
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